Introduction

This page contains additional references for the Introduction chapter in Responding to Healthcare Reform: A Strategy Guide for Heatlhcare Leaders.  The most current additions are at the top of the page.  It also includes the annotated references from the book and their associated hyperlinks.

Current References

The Kaiser Foundation provides one of the most reliable and frequently updated websites that contains resources to understand the implications of the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.  The Health Reform Source can be found here. 

Health Reform GPS is a joint project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Hirsh Health Law and Policy Program of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services.   With passage the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 the major work of turning law into real change begins.  Implementing any law is a complex  policymaking process in its own right.  Like the passage of a statute, the process of implementation is one in which government agencies, acting under ongoing Congressional oversight, interpret the law and more clearly define the policies that will guide the health care system.  In doing so, they are guided by the major health system stakeholders such as patients and consumers,  employers and unions, health insurers, and health care providers. This website provides a comprehensive resource for the details of these federal and state implementation activities.    

Latta, Viola B. and Helbing, Charles.  “Medicare short-stay hospital services by diagnosis-related groups.”  Health Care Financing Review; Summer 91, Vol. 12 Issue 4, p105, 36p, 2 Charts

Abstract: Examines Medicare short-stay hospital services by diagnosis-related groups. Diagnosis-related group assignment; Prospective payment system payment mechanism; Discharges specific to major diagnostic categories; Average length of stay of Medicare beneficiaries.

Annotated References from Responding to Reform

Baucus M. 2008. Call to Action: Health Reform 2009.” US Senate Finance Committee, Nov. 12.

Crosson, F. J. and L. A. Tollen. 2010. Partners in Health: How Physicians and Hospitals can be Accountable Together. Jossey Bass.

Gabel, J. R. 2010. ” Does the Congressional Budget Office Underestimate Savings from Reform? A Review of the Historical Record.” Commonwealth Fund Issue Brief

Henderson, J. W. 2002. Health Economics and Policy.” Southwestern. page 51.

Fronstin, P. 2010. “Health Savings Accounts and Health Reimbursement Arrangements: Assets, Account Balances, and Rollovers, 2006-2009.” EBRI Issue Brief. 343

Lindgren, M. and H. Bandhold. 2009. Scenario Planning: The Link between Future and Strategy. New York, NY: Palgrave – Macmillan.

Robinson, J. C., & P. B. Ginsburg. 2009. Consumer-Driven Health Care: Promise and Performance. [Online article or information; retrieved 2, 28.] http://content.healthaffairs.org/content/28/2/w272.full?sid=059645fd-0679-4b3c-8df8-2b25e1571360.

Additional Online Resources

The Complete Affordable Care Act

The Department of Human Services maintains the complete law on its website.  It is likely that they will update this as Congress amends the law.  The complete Affordable Care Act can be found at

http://docs.house.gov/energycommerce/ppacacon.pdf

with a DHS summary here:  www.healthcare.gov/law/provisions/index.html

Congressional Research Service Summaries of the Law

Healthcare reform legislation was introduced in September of 2009, passed by the Senate in December, and passed by the House in March of 2010. On March 23, 2010, The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was made into law (HR3590). After both chambers of Congress approved the original bill another law was enacted to improve certain aspects of the original.  This bill, The Health Care & Education Reconciliation Act (HR4872), was passed under the reconciliation process, which is why it contains a section on funding higher education.  The Affordable Care Act is the combination of the two bills. Following are summaries of both the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Health Care & Education Reconciliation Act. These summaries were produced by the Congressional Research Service of the Library of Congress.

HR 3590:  http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d111:HR03590:@@@D&summ2=m&

HR 4872:   http://thomas.loc.gov/cgi-bin/bdquery/z?d111:HR04872:@@@D&summ2=m&

Kaiser Summary of the Law

This 13-page document summarizes all the major provisions contained in the ACA.

http://www.kff.org/healthreform/upload/8061.pdf

Health Reform GPSThis resource is a joint project of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Hirsh Health Law and Policy Program of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. With passage of the Affordable Care Act the major work of turning law into real change begins. Implementing any law is a complex policymaking process in its own right. Like the passage of a statute, the process of implementation is one in which government agencies, acting under ongoing Congressional oversight, interpret the law and more clearly define the policies that will guide the health care system. In doing so, they are guided by the major health system stakeholders such as patients and consumers, employers and unions, health insurers, and health care providers.  Health Reform GPS provides excellent updates on key developments and Implementation issues:

http://www.healthreformgps.org/

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